$107,500 in funding announced by Ontario Liberals for Simcoe Muskoka Child, Youth and Family Services

Ontario is investing $16 million in more than 550 facility upgrades and repair projects at more than 140 community agencies across the province to help them better serve Ontario’s children, youth and families.

In our region, the Simcoe Muskoka Child Youth and Family Services will benefit to the tune of $107,500 worth of the funding. To see the projects which are being funded click here

Minister of Children and Youth Services Michael Coteau was at the Massey Centre in Toronto today to announce that that centre would receive $897,200 to support 23 projects as part of the investment through Ontario’s Partner Facility Renewal program. This funding will help the Massey Centre complete these needed upgrades and continue to provide excellent client-centred infant and early childhood mental health services in the community.

Overall, these investments will help children’s treatment centres, children’s aid societies and youth centres across Ontario to repair and maintain their facilities and offer more secure and accessible services.

Ontario is making the largest investment in public infrastructure in the province’s history — about $160 billion over 12 years, which is supporting 110,000 jobs every year across the province, with projects such as hospitals, schools, roads, bridges and transit. Since 2015, the province has announced support for more than 475 projects that will keep people and goods moving, connect communities and improve quality of life. To learn more about infrastructure projects in your community, go to Ontario.ca/BuildON.

Quick Facts

Approved projects include: upgrading accessible washrooms, replacing windows, repairing roofs, replacing furnaces, expanding program space, and installing carbon monoxide alarms and fire alarms.

Last year, hundreds of community agencies received more than $20 million toward upgrades and repairs.

Liberal Education Minister announces ban on child care wait list fees

Ontario has filed a regulation to end fees for child care wait lists to improve the accessibility of child care and make life easier for families.

The ban will take effect September 1, 2016, and will prevent licensed child care centres and home child care agencies from charging fees or requiring deposits to join child care wait lists.

The regulatory amendments also require licensed child care providers to:

Develop a public wait list policy that clearly explains how children on a wait list are offered admission.

Ensure wait list status is made available to families, in a manner that protects the confidentiality of their personal information.

The regulation was developed with feedback from public consultations and from the Ontario Regulatory website, with strong support for a ban on wait list fees from parents, child care providers and municipalities. The consultation period was open from May 17 to July 4, 2016.

“We listened to parents and heard their concerns about wait list fees. That’s why we are stopping this unfair practice. No family should have to pay to simply be on a waiting list for child care. We will continue working with our partners to build a high-quality and accessible child care and early years system that better serves Ontario’s children and families.”
Mitzie Hunter, Minister of Education

Giving Ontario’s children the best possible start in life is part of the government’s economic plan to build Ontario up and deliver on its number-one priority to grow the economy and create jobs. The four-part plan includes helping more people get and create the jobs of the future by expanding access to high-quality college and university education. The plan is making the largest infrastructure investment in hospitals, schools, roads, bridges and transit in Ontario’s history and is investing in a low-carbon economy driven by innovative, high-growth, export-oriented businesses. The plan is also helping working Ontarians achieve a more secure retirement.

QUICK FACTS

Ontario is the first province in Canada to ban child care wait list fees.

On May 16, 2016 Arthur Potts, MPP for Beaches – East York introduced a Private Member’s Bill in the Ontario legislature that would restrict licensees to charge non-refundable fees for child care wait lists.

In August 2015 the Child Care and Early Years Act, 2014, was proclaimed to strengthen oversight of the province’s unlicensed child care sector and increase access to licensed child care options, including before and after school programs where there is sufficient demand.

The province announced $120 million over three years in new funding in April 2015 dedicated to building more than 4,000 safe, high-quality, licensed child care spaces in schools across the province.

Since 2003–04, the government has doubled child care funding to more than $1 billion annually, and the number of licensed child care spaces in Ontario has grown to nearly 351,000 – an increase of 87 per cent.

Ontario is investing $269 million over three years to support a wage increase for early childhood educators and other child care professionals in licensed child care settings.