Feds investigating fireworks incident that injured Bracebridge Rotarian

An investigation into the incident that hospitalized a member of the Bracebridge Rotary Club last Friday is underway at the Federal level.

On October 28th at around 4:30pm, an explosion in Minett sent Bracebridge lawyer Jean Polak to Sunnybrook with serious injuries to her arm, head and torso.

Polak is a member of the licensed Rotary team that sets up for fireworks shows and it’s still unclear as to exactly what transpired.

Investigation under Canada’s Explosives Act

The fireworks, which were subsequently cancelled, were to have been part of the Rotary District Conference, which was being held at the JW Marriott Resort that weekend.

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Communications Officer Tania Carreira Pereira tells Muskoka News Watch that NRCan is aware of the incident and has initiated an investigation under the Explosives Act.

The Explosives Safety and Security Branch (ESSB) of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is responsible for administering the Explosives Act and regulations and pursuing the advancement of explosives safety and security technology. ESSB’s main priority is the safety and security of the public and all the workers involved in the explosives industry in Canada.

“If an infraction is determined to have been committed as part of an NRCan investigation, applicable fines and enforcement measures may be levied and/or applied,” she said in an email statement.

She also added that local and provincial authorities may also undertake their own investigations pursuant to their own legislation.

Since the incident, Polak has undergone surgeries and is now said to be in serious, but stable condition.

It’s currently not known how long the NRCan investigation will take.

“The investigation will be completed as soon as circumstances permit,” says Carreira Pereira.  “We normally do not make outcomes available, since the confidential information we receive under the Explosives Act cannot be disclosed pursuant section 23, unless an exception can be applied, as described in section 23 (2): http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/E-17/FullText.html.”

More details if they become available.

Related Links:

Prominent Bracebridge Lawyer Jean Polak in Sunnybrook following fireworks accident

Man charged with setting traps likely to cause bodily harm

A Parry Sound man’s been charged with setting traps likely to cause bodily harm after a search warrant was executed revealing a sizable amount of pot, growing equipment, ammo and weapons.

On November 3rd, members from the West Parry Sound Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), along with members of the OPP Community Drug Action Team, OPP West Parry Sound Crime Unit, the OPP Northeast Region Emergency Response Team (ERT) and the OPP Canine Unit executed a search warrant at a residence in Parry Sound.

During the investigation over 3500 grams of marijuana was seized.

Additionally, growing equipment, ammunition and weapons were also seized.

The estimated street value of the marijuana seized is approximately $12,000.

As a result of the investigation;

Steven Dingman, 47 years of age from Parry Sound was charged with:

  • Produce a Schedule II Substance (cannabis marihuana), contrary to section 7(1) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA)
  • Possession of a Schedule II  Substance for the Purpose of Trafficking  over 3 kg, contrary to section 5(2) of the CDSA
  • Possession of a Schedule II Substance (cannabis Marihuana) over 30g, contrary to section 4(1) of the CDSA
    • Three counts of Possession of a Firearm or Ammunition contrary to Prohibition Order, contrary to section 117.01(1) of the Criminal Code (CC)

 

  • Set Traps Likely To Cause Bodily Harm, contrary to section 247(1)(b) of the CC

The accused was held in custody for a bail hearing at the Ontario Court of Justice in Parry Sound, Ontario

 

 

Weapons call initiates two Hold and Secures at Orillia schools

There have been no arrests following a report today of a man carrying what was believed to be a long gun in the area of Park Street in Orillia.

At 3:35 p.m., the Orillia OPP responded to a report of a weapons call after receiving information from a school bus driver reporting a male walking on the sidewalk carrying what was believed to be a long gun.

Several officers immediately responded and as a precaution, a “Hold and Secure” of two schools in the area was initiated at Samuel De Champlain and the Orillia Secondary School.

Both schools were thoroughly searched as was the nearby vicinity.

The process lasted one hour. When each school was deemed safe, the Hold and Secure was lifted.

No one fitting the description was located.  Police are continuing their investigation.

The Orillia OPP would like to thank the school administration, staff, students and parents for their patience, understanding and co-operation during this difficult time.

Members of the Orillia Detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police are committed to public safety, delivering proactive and innovative policing in partnership with our communities. Officers value your contribution to building safe communities. If you have information about suspected unlawful activity, please contact the OPP at 1-888-310-1122 or visit Crime Stoppers at: www.crimestopperssdm.com or call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

 

Charges laid in Highway 69 fail to remain case

Charges have been laid in a fail to remain case that happened on Highway 69.

On October 30th at 4:30 p.m., members of the West Parry Sound Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) were called to a motor vehicle collision involving two vehicles on Highway 69.

Upon arrival, they learned that one of the drivers had fled into the bush.  

Vehicle stolen from Mactier

The police investigation revealed that the vehicle in question had been stolen from a residence in Mactier and as a result, 24 yr old Daniel Ashawasagai from Georgian Bay Township was charged with:

  • Theft of a motor vehicle under $5000, contrary to section 334(b) of the Criminal Code of Canada (CC)
  • Fail to Comply with Probation Order, contrary to section 733.1(1) of the CC
  • Careless Driving, contrary to section 130 of the Highway Traffic Act (HTA)
    • Driving While Under Suspension, contrary to section 53(1) of the HTA X2

      * Fail To Remain, contrary to section 200(1)(a) of the HTA

The accused will appear at the Ontario Court of Justice in Parry Sound on December 1st to answer to his charges.

 

Company fined $100,000 following injury to young worker

A Calgary-based company pleaded guilty and has been fined $100,000 after a young worker suffered permanent injuries.

The company, Tervita Corporation, was the constructor of a City of Barrie project to reclaim landfill at a site located at 272 Ferndale Drive North in Barrie.

On March 5th, 2015, a young worker (a person under the age of 25) employed by Tervita was operating a city-supplied trommel machine in the landfill. The machine is used to screen and separate material.

The worker was using a tool known as a “pick” to clear the trommel when it filled up with material being screened. While performing this task, the worker was pulled into an exposed pinch point on the machine created by the drive wheels.

The worker was able to get free but suffered injury that required medical attention.

Section 109 of Ontario Regulation 213/91 – the Construction Projects Regulation – states that every gear, pulley, belt, chain, shaft, flywheel, saw and other mechanically-operated part of a machine to which a worker has access shall be guarded or fenced so that it will not endanger a worker. This was also a violation of the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

The company pleaded guilty and was fined $100,000 by Justice of the Peace Cheryl B. McLean in provincial court in Barrie on November 1, 2016.

In addition to the fine, the court imposed a 25-per-cent victim fine surcharge as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The surcharge is credited to a special provincial government fund to assist victims of crime.

New and young workers in Ontario are more likely than older and more experienced workers to be injured on the job, especially during their first three months on the job.

The case was heard by Justice of the Peace Cheryl B. McLean in the Ontario Court of Justice/Provincial Offences Court at 45 Cedar Pointe Drive in Barrie, Ontario

Province combatting homelessness in Ontario communities

Ontario is helping individuals and families find safe and affordable housing, by increasing its investment in municipalities to help them meet the needs of those experiencing homelessness.

The additional investment from the province will further support municipalities in delivering housing- and homelessness-related services tailored to meet the needs of their communities through 2020. Services include:

  • Financial assistance and education programs to help prevent eviction
  • Long-term and transitional housing with related supports
  • Emergency shelters for those experiencing a crisis

Last year, the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative helped almost 40,000 families and individuals experiencing homelessness obtain housing. It also helped more than 115,000 families and individuals at-risk of homelessness remain in their homes.

“We are helping Ontario’s most vulnerable take the first step out of poverty by arming communities with the tools they need to help individuals and families access safe and affordable housing. Ensuring every Ontarian has a safe place to call home helps build stronger communities and a more prosperous Ontario.”
— Chris Ballard, Minister of Housing and the Minister Responsible for the Poverty Reduction Strategy

Investing in programs to prevent and reduce homelessness is part of our plan to create jobs, grow our economy and help people in their everyday lives.

QUICK FACTS

  • Ontario is investing an additional $15 million in the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI), bringing the government’s annual contribution to $338.7 million by 2019-2020, which is an increase of $92 million since the program launched in 2013. This funding builds on the $15 million in each of 2017-18, 2018-19 that was announced in October 2016. The program is also providing municipalities with $293.7 million in 2016-2017, $308.7 million in 2017-2018, and $323.7 million in 2018-2019.
  • The CHPI reinforces the bold and transformative update to Ontario’s Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy, and supports the province’s goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2025.
  • Every $15 million invested in the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative is estimated to help about 2,600 households experiencing homelessness find housing, or prevent approximately 14,200 households from becoming homeless.
  • Since 2003, Ontario has committed more than $5 billion to affordable housing. This includes the recent federal-provincial partnership to extend the Investment in Affordable Housing program.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Province launching new supports for adoptive families

Province launching new supports for adoptive families

As Ontario enters Adoption Awareness Month, the province is launching new supports for adoptive families, including a grant program to help families cover the costs of post-secondary education for adopted children.

The new Living and Learning Grants will provide support to adoptive families with a child enrolled in a full-time post-secondary program, helping to remove financial barriers and give more youth the opportunity to pursue higher education.

In addition, 15 new adoption recruiters will start work across Ontario this November to help connect more Crown wards with adoptive families. The province is partnering with Wendy’s Wonderful Kids to support the new recruiters, who will work to build relationships with children and youth in care and develop recruitment plans specific to each child’s needs.

Ontario also offers additional supports to make life easier for families adopting Crown wards, including:

  • Support to pay for drug and dental benefits
  • Peer-to-peer supports through Adopt4Life, including mentorship and parent resources for adoptive families
  • Specialized training through the Adoption Council of Ontario for parents who adopt through children’s aid societies.

The province is also supporting greater use of customary care, a culturally appropriate placement option for First Nations children and youth, by providing one-time financial assistance to support First Nations families to welcome First Nations children in need of protection into their homes.

Helping children and youth find forever homes and access post-secondary education is part of the province’s plan to help all children and youth in Ontario reach their full potential to succeed.

QUICK FACTS

  • Crown wards are children and youth that are cared for by foster homes or group homes because they have been abused, neglected or because their family situation could have placed them at risk.
  • The Living and Learning Grant provides $500 per month, to support youth in full-time postsecondary education.
  • One-time funding of up to $5,000 is available for customary caregivers to provide a safe, secure and comfortable environment to children and youth, as well as to make home repairs or purchase furniture or other items needed to support the well-being of children.
  • Ontario is investing $24 million this year in these enhanced adoption services.
  • The new recruiters will be working with children’s aid societies across Ontario.
  • There are about 5,800 Ontario children and youth who are growing up in foster and group care as Crown wards.
  • About 1,000 Crown wards are adopted into permanent homes each year in Ontario.
  • The government serves as the guardian of all Crown wards.
  • There is no cost to adoptive parents to go through the public adoption process with a children’s aid society.